JetBlue

Traveling with a lap infant on international flights

» Traveling internationally with a lap infant
» Traveling Between Aruba and the U.S.
» Traveling Between the Bahamas and the U.S.
» Traveling Between Bermuda and the U.S.
» Traveling between Colombia and the U.S.
» Traveling between Costa Rica and the U.S.
» Traveling Between the Dominican Republic and the U.S.
» Traveling between Jamaica and the U.S.
» Traveling between Mexico and the U.S.
» Traveling Between St. Maarten and the U.S.
» Guidelines for an Infant/Child Safety Seat

 
Traveling internationally with a lap infant

A child over three days old until their second birthday is considered a lap child and does not need to pay for a seat. JetBlue does not reserve a seat for these children unless a separate seat is purchased.

Once a child has their second birthday, they are no longer considered a lap child and a seat must be purchased in order for them to travel. If the child has their second birthday between the outbound and return flight, a seat will need to be purchased for the return flight.

All customers are required to have a valid passport for international travel. Customers will be required to present the infant's passport to a JetBlue crewmember prior to boarding any international flight. In addition to the country-specific documentation requirements outlined below, infants between three and 14 days old must also have, in the form of a letter, their doctor's approval to travel.

Customers traveling with lap infants and departing FROM an international destination (Exception: Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands) to the U.S. will be assessed an infant fee. Please note the infant fees vary based upon international point of origin. Should the customer be traveling round trip, the fee is only assessed when flying FROM the international city to the U.S.

Example:

Roundtrip

Outbound: John F Kennedy, NY – Nassau, Bahamas (no infant fee assessed or charged)
Return:      Nassau, Bahamas – John F Kennedy, NY (infant fee assessed and charged)

  • All infants/lap children traveling from an international destination to the U.S. must be ticketed
  • Lap infants must be traveling with an adult customer at least 14 years of age or older, and the infant must sit on the adult's lap during takeoff and landing.
  • Only one lap child per adult is allowed. Due to the number of oxygen masks per row on the A320, E190 and core A321, only one lap child is allowed per row of three seats. On the Mint A321 there are four oxygen masks available in each seat group, so there are no restrictions on the number of lap infants.
  • A lap child may bring one diaper bag, one stroller and a car seat. They do not qualify for the checked baggage allowance.
In addition to the information above, regardless of nationality, children traveling with an adult other than a parent (or both parents for the Dominican Republic) or legal guardian must have a notarized letter of authorization.

Traveling Between Aruba and the U.S.
An infant fee will be assessed on all flights departing from Aruba to the United States. Fees may vary. For more information, please call 1-800-JETBLUE (538-2583).

Traveling Between the Bahamas and the U.S.
An infant fee will be assessed on all flights departing from the Bahamas to the United States. Fees may vary. For more information, please call 1-800-JETBLUE (538-2583).

Traveling Between Bermuda and the U.S.
An infant fee will be assessed on all flights departing from Bermuda to the United States. Fees may vary. For more information, please call 1-800-JETBLUE (538-2583).

Traveling between Colombia and the U.S.

An infant fee will be assessed on all flights departing from Colombia to the United States. Fees may vary. For more information, please call 1-800-JETBLUE (538-2583).

Please note: Fees will be collected at the airport ticket counter.

In addition to the information above, children who are residents of Colombia traveling with an adult other than a parent or legal guardian must have a notarized letter of authorization.

Also note: Infants who are citizens of any country other than Colombia are required to pay the $10 Colombian Tourist Tax (CTT) upon departure.


Traveling between Costa Rica and the U.S.
An infant fee will be assessed on all flights departing from Costa Rica to the United States. Fees may vary. For more information, please call 1-800-JETBLUE (538-2583).

Traveling Between the Dominican Republic and the U.S.

Passports are required for international travel. Please note the additional requirements listed below.

Strict exit requirements apply to minors under 18 years of age (of any nationality) who are residents in the Dominican Republic. Such children traveling alone, without both parents, or with anyone other than the parent(s), must present written authorization from a parent or legal guardian. This authorization must be in Spanish, and it must be notarized at a Dominican consulate in the United States or notarized and then certified at the Dominican Attorney General’s office (Procuraduria de la Republica) if done in the Dominican Republic. Though not a requirement for non-resident minors (in the Dominican Republic), the U.S. Embassy recommends that any minor traveling to the Dominican Republic without one or both parents have a notarized document from the parent(s).

This letter of authorization must:

  • Be written in Spanish;
  • Contain the name of the child, the parent or legal guardian, and, if applicable, the adult accompanying the child; and
  • If the child is a U.S. citizen: be signed by the parent or legal guardian in front of a Consulate of the Dominican Republic
  • If the child is a citizen of the Dominican Republic: be signed by the parent or legal guardian and notarized at a Dominican Republic Consulate in the U.S.

The specific guidelines on the Dominican regulations governing the travel of children in the Dominican Republic may be found in Spanish at http://www.migracion.gov.do or click here.

For a list of Dominican Republic consulates, click here.

An infant fee will be assessed on all flights departing the Dominican Republic to the United States.


Traveling between Jamaica and the U.S.

Passports are required for international travel.

An infant fee will be assessed on all flights departing Jamaica to the United States.


Traveling between Mexico and the U.S.

Please present the child's passport for international travel.

Minors traveling with an adult other than their legal parents or guardians must have an original notarized letter of permission signed by both parents authorizing travel, and a photo ID is required. In addition, the letter should state the name, address and phone number of the person with whom the child is traveling.

Minors traveling with only one parent or the sole custody parent must have a notarized letter of permission from the non-custodial parent or a "Sole Custody" or "Father Unknown" document. However, if the child's last name is different from the last name of the accompanying parent(s), proof of parentage is required. Parents name changes must be documented (i.e. marriage certificate).

EXCEPTION: Children from Mexico often have a stamp on their passports that reads, "El titular del presente pasaporte viaja de conformidad con El Articulo 421 del Codigo Civil Vigente." This phrase allows the child to travel with only one parent and without a notarized letter.


Traveling Between St. Maarten and the U.S.

An infant fee will be assessed on all flights departing from St. Maarten to the United States. Fees may vary. For more information, please call 1-800-JETBLUE (538-2583).

In addition to the information above, regardless of nationality, children traveling with an adult other than a parent or legal guardian must have a notarized letter of authorization.


Guidelines for an Infant/Child Safety Seat

Infants and children may occupy a seat with or without a Child Restraint System (CRS). If the infant is not in a child restraint system, they must be able to sit upright. Use of booster seats, harness and vest restraints will not be allowed during the movement on surface, takeoff or landing, unless it is an FAA-approved device.

*All special accommodations are left to the discretion of the Inflight crewmembers.

If checking a safety seat, it will not count as one of your checked bags and there is no fee assessed.

Child aviation restraint systems (CARES) are also certified by the FAA for use during all phases of flight including taxiing, takeoff, landing and during periods of turbulence. CARES is a belt-and-buckle device that attaches directly to the aircraft seatbelt. It is designed for children over one year old, weighing between 22 and 44 pounds.

Please note, JetBlue does not provide safety seats, child aviation restraint systems (CARES), nor the bags/boxes to cover them.

In addition, the following guidelines will be observed:

  • an infant safety seat should be placed in a window seat; it may be placed in a middle seat or aisle seat as long as the other seat(s) remain empty or occupied by another infant seat. An infant safety seat may not obstruct a customer's pathway to the aisle.
  • infant safety seats may not be placed between two individuals.
  • an infant safety seat may face backward if it is FAA approved and properly secured by the parent/guardian
  • only one lap infant will be assigned per row of seats on each side of the aircraft.
  • lap infants may not be seated in emergency exit rows 
  • any infant seat used during flight must remain secured to the passenger seat at all times, even when unoccupied.
  • seatbelts must fit low and tight across the waist of all customers including children and must be affixed to all Child Restraint Systems (CRS) so that it is secured tightly in the seat. In seats equipped with an airbag seatbelt, JetBlue-provided seatbelt extensions must be used in conjunction with the seatbelt to secure the CRS. For safety purposes, if the CRS is not able to be properly secured with the airbag seatbelt, the customer may be required to move to a seat with a standard seatbelt in order to use the CRS.

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